Redpoll (Carduelis cabaret)

January 23, 2021

Robin (Erithacus rubecula)

January 23, 2021

Marsh Tit (Poecile palustris)

January 23, 2021

Scientific name: Poecile palustris

Family: Tits (Paridae)

Wingspan: 18 - 19cm (7 - 8")

Diet: Mainly insects and seeds

Feed with: Peanuts, seed and suet

Habitat: Marsh Tits can be located in parks, gardens and broad-leaf woodland. They are abundant in southern England and South Wales.

Marsh Tit Characteristics

Marsh Tits are small birds and part of the Paridae family that includes willow tits and coal tits. In fact, the marsh tit is almost indistinguishable from the willow tit, and it's easy to get them mixed up. The primary differences in appearance are that the marsh tit has a glossier cap and marginally neater bib. The greatest difference is the call, which for the marsh tit is a simple, repetitive sound.

In terms of appearance, the marsh tit has a mainly brown coating with a glossy black crown and bib. The pale light sandy brown underbelly contrasts well with the darker brown back.

Marsh tits are common in British gardens but can often be seen out in nature among the trees of broadleaf woodland. They are abundant across most parts of the UK, especially so in southern parts of the UK.

Marsh Tit Feeding

Marsh Tits feed mainly on insects and seed. If supply is abundant, marsh tits have the habit of hoarding stocks of food for the harsh struggles of winter weather and rainy days.

Marsh tits can be enticed into the garden with peanuts, seeds (particularly black sunflower seeds) and suet fats, but usually the garden needs to be close by to a woodland.

Marsh Tit Breeding & Nesting

Marsh Tit breeding begins around mid-April, with an incubation period for eggs of around 13 - 17 days, and then between 16 - 21 fledge days. Once the young have hatched, both parents help to feed. The eggs are smooth, white and glossy and covered in small brown dots and marks.

Marsh Tit nests are built, as with many other species of bird, by the female. The primary building materials are moss and common linings include feathers and hair. The nest is cup shaped and can be found in deciduous trees.

Leave a comment

Optionally add an image (JPEG only)

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.