Siskin (Carduelis spinus)

January 23, 2021

Marsh Tit (Poecile palustris)

January 23, 2021

Redpoll (Carduelis cabaret)

January 23, 2021

Redpoll Characteristics

There are four different types of redpoll in the UK, the most common of which is the lesser redpoll.

Our most common redpoll resident features a black and yellow streaked plumage with a dark brown forked tail. In contrast to these plain coloured streaks, the redpoll features a dash of red on its head.

This tiny bird bird is part of the finch family and is about the same size as a great tit. The lesser redpoll is best spotted over winter in the UK, where they can be seen hanging from the branches and twigs of birch and alder trees. It is easier to view them in winter on these deciduous trees when all the leaves have fallen.

Redpoll Feeding

Small seeds from trees such as alder, birch and spruce constitute the main diet of the lesser redpoll. They often feed among branches, hidden away, but can be seen clearly through winter once the leaves have fallen.

In the garden, lesser Redpolls like to visit garden bird feeders and will eat niger seeds.

Scientific name: Carduelis cabaret

Family: Finches (Fringillidae)

Wingspan: 20 - 25cm (4 1/2 - 6")

Diet: Very small seeds

Feed with: Niger seed

Habitat: It is easier to view the Redpool throughout winter. They breed mainly in Scotland and north east England.

Lifespan: 2 Years

Redpoll Breeding & Nesting

Repoll nests are cup-shaped, often untidy and made from materials such as fine brittle twigs and grass. It is possible to see lesser redpoll nests in deciduous woodland in winter.

Breeding begins in May and lesser redpoll eggs are found to be glossy and smooth with a pale blue hue and small pinkish speckles. Incubation usually lasts between 10 - 13 days with around 11 - 14 fledge days.

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1 comment

  1. Just had one of these on the feeder with Niger seed mix (in South Nottingham). Never seen one of these birds before and had to look it up, a nice first!